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Humanities

HUM 102

Ancient Greece (3 credits)

Traces Greek history from the development of Greek civilization as manifested in political, intellectual, and creative achievements from the Bronze Age to the end of the classical period. Students read original sources in translation as well as the works of modern scholars.

HUM 202

Early Middle Ages

(AD 284-1000) (3 credits)

Explores developments in the political, social, and religious history of Western Europe from the accession of Diocletian to the feudal transformation. Topics include the conversion of Europe to Christianity, the fall of the Roman Empire, the rise of Islam and the Arabs, the “Dark Ages,” Charlemagne and the Carolingian renaissance, and the Viking and Hungarian invasions.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or permission.

HUM 302

Renaissance (AD 1300-1600)

Explores the political, military, religious, philosophical, social, economic, and cultural history of Europe in the Renaissance.  Topics and events include the development of Humanism, the Protestant revolution, Council of Trent, exploration of the Americas, and notable personalities of the era.  Students read works by modern scholars and translations of works by Renaissance writers; and also examine non-textual sources, including examples of the art, architecture, and material culture of Renaissance Europe.  Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission.

HUM 402

Modernity (3 credits)

Explores modernism as a philosophical position, its development, and, in particular, its influence on contemporary secular society and the Catholic Church.  Students will read excerpts from modernist philosophers and various documents of the Church addressing modernism, in addition to writings by Catholic theologians influenced by modernism, such as Romano Guardini, and their subsequent influence on Vatican Council II. 

Prerequisite: Senior standing or permission.

HUM 201

Ancient Rome (3 credits)

Traces the history of Rome from its beginnings to the 5th century A.D. The first half covers Kingship to Republican form; the conquest of Italy; Roman expansion: Pyrrhus, Punic Wars and provinces; classes, courts, and the Roman revolution; Augustus and the formation of empire. The second half covers Virgil to the Vandals; major social, economic, political and religious trends at Rome and in the provinces.  The development of the Church in Rome will be a constant theme throughout the course.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or permission.

HUM 301 – Late Middle Ages (AD1000-1300) (3 credits)

Explores the political, military, religious, social, economic, and cultural history of Europe in the high and late middle ages. Topics and events include the Crusades, the Black Death, the rise of centralized governments, the growth of towns, and their long-term effects on European society.  Students read works by modern scholars and translations of works by Medieval writers; and also examine non-textual sources, including examples of the art, architecture, and material culture of medieval Europe.  Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission.

HUM 401

Enlightenment and Americanism

(3 credits)

Studies the principles and major events of the Enlightenment and their influence on John Locke and the founding fathers of the United States in developing a revolutionary the unique political and cultural structure of America.  Students will also examine writing of the sixteenth-century Spanish Dominicans, their influence on John Locke, and how the American Revolution correlated to and departed from Catholic teaching.  Prerequisite: Senior standing or permission.

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