Course Descriptions

HUM 102 – Ancient Greece (3 credits)

Traces Greek history from the development of Greek civilization as manifested in political, intellectual, and creative achievements from the Bronze Age to the end of the classical period. Students read original sources in translation as well as the works of modern scholars.

 

HUM 201 – Ancient Rome (3 credits)

Traces the history of Rome from its beginnings to the 5th century A.D. The first half covers Kingship to Republican form; the conquest of Italy; Roman expansion: Pyrrhus, Punic Wars and provinces; classes, courts, and the Roman revolution; Augustus and the formation of empire. The second half covers Virgil to the Vandals; major social, economic, political and religious trends at Rome and in the provinces.  The development of the Church in Rome will be a constant theme throughout the course. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or permission.

 

HUM 202 – Early Middle Ages (AD 284-1000) (3 credits)

Explores developments in the political, social, and religious history of Western Europe from the accession of Diocletian to the feudal transformation. Topics include the conversion of Europe to Christianity, the fall of the Roman Empire, the rise of Islam and the Arabs, the “Dark Ages,” Charlemagne and the Carolingian renaissance, and the Viking and Hungarian invasions. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or permission.

 

HUM 301 – Late Middle Ages (AD1000-1300) (3 credits)

Explores the political, military, religious, social, economic, and cultural history of Europe in the high and late middle ages. Topics and events include the Crusades, the Black Death, the rise of centralized governments, the growth of towns, and their long-term effects on European society.  Students read works by modern scholars and translations of works by Medieval writers; and also examine non-textual sources, including examples of the art, architecture, and material culture of medieval Europe.  Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission.

 

HUM 302 – Renaissance (AD 1300-1600)

Explores the political, military, religious, philosophical, social, economic, and cultural history of Europe in the Renaissance.  Topics and events include the development of Humanism, the Protestant revolution, Council of Trent, exploration of the Americas, and notable personalities of the era.  Students read works by modern scholars and translations of works by Renaissance writers; and also examine non-textual sources, including examples of the art, architecture, and material culture of Renaissance Europe.  Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission.

 

HUM 401 – Enlightenment and Americanism (3 credits)

Studies the principles and major events of the Enlightenment and their influence on John Locke and the founding fathers of the United States in developing a revolutionary the unique political and cultural structure of America.  Students will also examine writing of the sixteenth-century Spanish Dominicans, their influence on John Locke, and how the American Revolution correlated to and departed from Catholic teaching.  Prerequisite: Senior standing or permission.

 

HUM 402 – Modernity (3 credits)

Explores modernism as a philosophical position, its development, and, in particular, its influence on contemporary secular society and the Catholic Church.  Students will read excerpts from modernist philosophers and various documents of the Church addressing modernism, in addition to writings by Catholic theologians influenced by modernism, such as Romano Guardini, and their subsequent influence on Vatican Council II.  Prerequisite: Senior standing or permission.

 

THL 101 – Scripture: Salvation History (3 credits)

Provides an understanding of God's comprehensive plan for the salvation of mankind as the revelation of that plan unfolds in human time and through God ordained events from Genesis to the establish of the Church. Students will study twelve periods of Bible history, touching on the major Biblical and historical events of each period with references to the corresponding Biblical passages.

 

THL 102 – Scripture: Revelation, Faith, and Reason (3 credits)

Examines Scripture as a source of Divine revelation, in addition to the relationship between the intrinsic relationship between revelation, faith, and reason.  Topics will include Catholic teaching on faith and reason, reason and revelation, reason and faith, the acceptance of revelation by faith, and sources of revelation outside of Scripture and their relationship to Scripture

 

THL 201 – Aquinas: Mystery of the Trinity (3 credits)

Engages the mystery of the Trinity through an explication of the Church’s doctrine regarding the Trinity, especially as articulated by St. Thomas Aquinas.  Students will study the definitive revelation of the triune identity of God through and in the person of Jesus Christ and trace the development of the Church’s reflection and proclamation of this mystery through her controversies and councils, seeking to understand key systematic developments, especially in the Patristic and Medieval periods.  Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or permission.

 

THL 202 – Aquinas: Creation and Providence (3 credits)

Studies creation as a function of Divine providence, with particular emphasis on the writings of St. Thomas Aquinas.  Topics will include St. Thomas’ understanding of nature, the doctrine of man as the image of God, Divine agency and the autonomy of nature, creation and Genesis, and creation and evolution in the contemporary world.  Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or permission.

 

THL 301 – Aquinas: Grace, Sin, and Redemption (3 credits)

Studies grace as a free and undeserved gift from God to enable man to respond to His call to be His adoptive children; sin as the rejection of God’s grace; and redemption as God’s deliverance of man from the ravages of sin through the sacrifice of His Only-begotten Son, Jesus, Christ on the Cross at Calvary.  Students will study particularly St. Thomas Aquinas’ discussions of these topics, in addition to those for which they serve as a basis, such as merit, atonement,  and sacrifice. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission.

 

THL 302 – Aquinas: Mystery of the Incarnation (3 credits)

Studies creation, man’s need for God and God’s provident, loving and redeeming plan for man, and the definitive revelation of the mystery of God through the Incarnation of Christ.  Students will focus primarily on St. Thomas’ treatise on the Incarnation of the Son of God, and also study selected writings of the early Church Councils on the subject, such as Ephesus I and Nicea II, and of the early Church Fathers on the subject, such as St. Athanasius, St. Gregory of Nyssa, and St. Cyril of Alexandra.  Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission.

 

THL 401 – The Body of Christ: Ecclesiology (3 credits)

An examination of the Church as the extension of the Incarnation of the God-man, Jesus Christ, born from the wounded side of Christ.  Students will study the great Masters and Magisterial teachings of Catholic tradition regarding the questions that pertain specifically to the mystery of the Church—her nature, origin, foundation, structure, visible and invisible aspects, membership, hierarchical constitution, purpose and destiny.  Students will also explore various images of the Church such as Immaculate Bride of Christ, Mystical Body of Christ, the Family of God, the New Israel, the Mother and Teacher of all nations.  Finally, students will reflect scientifically and reverently on the mystery of the Church into which they have been reborn and by whose life they live as members of Christ.  Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission.

 

THL 402 – Our Life in Christ: Catholic Social Doctrine (3 credits)

Studies the Church’s efforts through history to address questions regarding life in society.  Students will examine works, especially from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, that systematically present the foundations of Catholic social doctrine, the value of Catholic social doctrine as an instrument of evangelization, and the importance of moral values in the development of social teaching.  Students will also compare the perennial teaching of the Church on the subject of ecclesiology with the changes that were instituted in the writings of Vatican Council II and engage the role of Catholic social teaching in addressing contemporary societal issues.  Prerequisite: Senior standing or permission.

 

PHIL 102 – Plato: Intro to Philosophy (3 credits)

Examines how philosophy differs from science, religion, and other modes of human discourse, by tracing the origins of philosophy in the Western tradition in the thinkers of Ancient Greece. Students will focus on Plato’s thoughts about the ultimate constituents of reality, along with the thoughts of his teacher, Socrates, and their some of their predecessors.

 

PHIL 301 – Aristotle: Philosophy of Man (3 credits)

Examines Aristotle’s understanding of man, as described in his ethical work, Nicomachean Ethics.  Students will explore Aristotle’s description of human nature as having rational and irrational psyches as well as a natural drive for creating society, gaining knowledge, finding happiness and feeling connected with God, both it its own right, and as a foundation for the theological and philosophical developments of St. Thomas Aquinas.  Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission.

 

PHIL 302 – Aristotle: Ethics (3 credits)

Continues the study of Aristotle from PHIL 301, studying further Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics and also his Eudemian Ethics.  Students will explore Aristotle’s view of ethical theory as distinct from the theoretical sciences by examining its methodology, its general principles, and its application to the nature of human well-being.  Students will also study the ethical virtues (justice, courage, temperance and so on) and how such virtues are acquired.  Again, Aristotelian thought will be engaged as foundational to Thomastic thought.  Prerequisite: PHIL 301 or permission.  Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission.

 

PHIL 401 – Aristotle: Politics (3 credits)

Studies Aristotle’s Politics, with its guides for rulers and statement, as a basis for exploring the role of politics in contemporary society, the proper comportment of politicians.  Students will also engage this study in the context of Catholic teaching regarding the universal kingship of Jesus Christ.  Prerequisite: Senior standing or permission.

 

PHIL 402 – Aristotle: Metaphysics (3 credits)

Examines Aristotle’s Metaphysics to study such topics as first causes and the principles of things; substance, matter, and subject; substance and essence.  Students will study these and other topics as foundational to understanding Catholic theological doctrines on such matters as transubstantiation.  Prerequisite: Senior standing or permission.

 

MUS 101 – Music History I (3 credits)

Studies the Greek precursory terminology to Medieval modal terminology, the Medieval Octoechos, Carolingian chant, and especially Carolingian notation.  Students will attempt to infuse the interpretive nuances indicated in early notation into contemporary chant performance.  Students will also learn the musical part of the Mass and the Divine Office.

 

MUS 301  - Music History II (1 credit)

Surveys many of the musical works – mostly by listening – that are not covered in Music History I, III, or IV. 

 

MUS 102/CAT 102 – Music History III (3 credits)

Surveys the development of music in the Catholic Church in three significant periods of reform: the reforms of Pope John XXII (13th century), the reforms of the Council of Trent (16th century), and the reforms of Pope Benedict XIV (18th century). Students will examine in each period the reason for reform, the actual reforms, and their results.  In addition, students will come to know many of the great musical treasures of the Church’s musical repertoire.

 

MUS 201 – Music History IV (3 credits)

Surveys the development of music in the Catholic Church in two significant periods of reform: the reforms of Pope Pius X and his immediate successors (first half of 10th century), and the reforms of the Vatican Council II (second half of the 20th century).  Students will examine in each period the reason for reform, the actual reforms, and their results.  In addition, students will come to know many of the great musical treasures of the Church’s musical repertoire.

 

Art 302 – Classical and Byzantine Art (3 credits)

Surveys various forms of art that develop Christian themes and imagery.  Students will explore how early Christian art drew from and yet differentiated itself from its classical Greek and Roman art, how art adorned everything from sarcophagi, to buildings, to paintings, icons, statues, furnishings, vestments and more.  In addition, students will study how Eastern and Western philosophies about art resulted in very different paths of development.

Art 402 – Medieval to Baroque Art (3 credits)

Surveys various forms of art that develop Christian themes and imagery from about AD 500 to about AD 1750.  Students will study great art works of various genres, including architecture, in both Eastern and Western traditions, as well as the philosophies and events that shaped their development. 

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SCI 101 – Biology (3 credits)

Introduces important biological concepts and principles common to all living organisms. Topics include the cell, energetics, genetics, physiology, and ecology. Integrates laboratory and classroom work and is taught from the perspective of Catholic teaching regarding life.

 

SCI 401 – Natural Philosophy and Modern Science (3 credits)

Challenges the idea that Science has replaced natural philosophy.  By a comparative analysis of natural philosophy, theology, and science, students will grapple with the relevance to and proper role of natural philosophy in the development contemporary science and the issues that scientific developments raise.  Prerequisite: Senior standing or permission.

 

MTH 201 – Math Applications: Intro to Programming (3 credits)

Provides an introduction into several programming languages, such as Learn HTML5, CSS3, JavaScript, jQuery, Bootstrap, Express.js, React.js, Node.js, Database Theory, MongoDB, MySQL, Command Line,  and/or Git.  The languages will vary depending upon industry uses.  Students will work on real-world projects, building websites, creating full stack single page applications, and more.

 

MTH 401 – Statistics (3 credits)

Aquaints students with the techniques of elementary statistics. Emphasizes computation and interpretation of data. Topics include calculation and graphing methods, measures of central tendency, measures of variation, measures of association and correlation; sampling and hypothesis testing.  Prerequisite: Senior standing or permission.

 

TRV 101 – Logic I: Grammar and Language (1 credit)

Studies grammar as the basis for clarity in language.  Topics include  a review of all parts of speech; phrase, sentence, and paragraph construction (syntax); morphology, and etymology.  Students will work in different written and oral forms.

TRV 102 – Logic II: Socratic Logic (3 credits)

Continues to develop fluency with the knowledge base of TRV 101 using the Socratic method in various topics.  Students will work in different written and oral forms.  Prerequisite: TRV 101 or permission.

TRV 201 – Readings in Written Rhetoric (1 credit)

Builds on TRV 101 and TRV 102 by analyzing examples of rhetorical writing.  Students will analyze examples ranging from classical Roman rhetoric to contemporary political speeches.  Prerequisite: TRV 102 or permission.

 

TRV 202 – Written Rhetoric II: Composition (3 credits)

Builds on TRV 101, TRV 102, and TRV 201 by writing examples of assigned forms using various techniques studied in earlier semesters. Prerequisite: TRV 201 or permission.

 

TRV 301 – Oral Rhetoric I (3 credits)

Builds on TRV 101, TRV 102, TRV 201, and TRV 202 by delivering prepared examples of assigned forms using various techniques studied in earlier semesters. Prerequisite: TRV 202 or permission.

 

TRV 302 – Oral Rhetoric II (1 credit)

Continues the process started in TRV 301 with students delivering both prepared and extemporaneous examples of assigned forms using various techniques studied in earlier semesters.  Prerequisite: TRV 301 or permission.

 

CAT 101, CAT 201, CAT 301 (1 credit each)

In the Catholic Seminar, students study, engage, and debate various issues of current importance in the Church.  The seminar is a rotating topics course.  Thus, specific topics will vary from semester to semester.  Examples of topics include The Divine Office, Externals of the Catholic Faith, Vocations, Apologetics, History of the Liturgy, Exercise and Importance of Tradition.

 

CAT 102/MUS 102 (1 credit)

One of the Catholic Seminars is a fixed course.  It is the same as MUS 102, described above.

 

LAT 101 – Elementary Latin I (4 credits)

Introduces Latin as a spoken and written language.  Students study the fundamentals of grammar, vocabulary, ecclesiastical pronunciation, elementary vocal expression and dialogues, and reading comprehension. 

 

LAT 102 – Elementary Latin II (4 credits)

Continues all the topics of LAT 101.  Students will complete the fundamentals of grammar in this semester and will develop an adequate vocabulary to understand all the common parts of the Mass.  Prerequisite: LAT 101 or permission.

 

LAT 201 – Intermediate Latin I (4 credits)

Continues to develop fluency with spoken Latin and begins readings in Latin prose, such as Julius Caesar’s Gallic Wars.  Prerequisite: LAT 102 or permission.

 

LAT 202 – Intermediate Lain II (4 credits)

Continues to develop fluency with spoken Latin, readings in Latin prose, and introduces classical Latin poetry. Prerequisite: LAT 201 or permission.

 

LAT 301 – Advanced Latin I (3 credits)

Continues to develop fluency with spoken Latin, and more advanced readings in Latin prose, and Latin poetry, including Latin hymns and Psalms.  Prerequisite: LAT 202 or permission.

 

LAT 302 – Advanced Latin II (3 credits)

Continues to develop fluency with spoken Latin, and more advanced readings in Latin prose, and Latin poetry, including Latin hymns and Psalms.  By the end of this semester students will develop an adequate vocabulary to understand all the Psalms, hymns, readings, and orations of Lauds and Vespers.  Prerequisite: LAT 301 or permission.

 

LAT 401 – Advanced Latin III (3 credits)

Continues to develop fluency with spoken Latin, advanced readings in Latin prose and Latin poetry, and introduces scriptural and theological readings in Latin.  Prerequisite: LAT 302 or permission.

 

LAT 402 – Advanced Latin IV (3 credits)

Continues to develop fluency with spoken Latin, advanced readings in Latin prose and Latin poetry, and scriptural and theological readings in Latin.  Prerequisite: LAT 401 or permission.

 

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The Collegium is currently seeking approval to operate as a degree-granting institution

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We anticipate this process will be completed by the end of 2020,

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